The Eurasian Journal of Medicine
Original Article

Factors Affecting Hand Hygiene Adherence at a Private Hospital in Turkey

Eurasian J Med 2015; 47: 208-212
DOI: 10.5152/eurasianjmed.2015.78
Read: 1478 Downloads: 692 Published: 03 September 2019

Abstract

Objective: Nosocomial infections are the main problems rising morbidity and mortality in health care settings. Hand hygiene is the most effective method for preventing these infections. In this study, we aimed to investigate the factors related with hand hygiene adherence at a private hospital in Turkey.

 

Materials and Methods: This study was conducted between March and June 2010 at a private hospital in Turkey. During the observation period, employees were informed about training, then posters and images were hanged in specific places of the hospital. After the initial observation, training on nosocomial infections and hand hygiene was provided to the hospital staff in March 2010. Contacts were classified according to occupational groups and whether invasive or not. These observations were evaluated in terms of compatibility with hand hygiene guidelines.

 

Results: Hand hygiene adherence rate of trained doctors was higher than untrained ones before patient contact and after environment contact [48% (35/73) versus 82% (92/113) p<0.05 and 23% (5/22) versus 76% (37/49) p<0.05 respectively]. Hand hygiene adherence rate of trained nurses was higher than untrained ones before patient contact [63% (50/79) versus 76% (37/49) p<0.05]. Hand hygiene adherence rate of trained assistant health personnel was higher than untrained ones before asepsis [20% (2/10) versus 73% (16/22) p<0.05]. In addition, it was seen that hand antiseptics were used when hand washing was not possible.

 

Conclusion: The increase at the rate of hand washing after training reveals the importance of feedback of the observations, as well as the training. One of the most important ways of preventing nosocomial infections is hand hygiene training that should be continued with feedbacks.

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EISSN 1308-8742